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Saturday, 30 April 2016 06:52

The Dream of 'Abdul Muttalib

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When the rule of Makkah Mukarramah fell onto the shoulders of ‘Abdul Muttalib and the divine will of Allah Ta’ala decreed that the well which had been totally forgotten should now be rediscovered, He directed ‘Abdul Muttalib, by means of pious dreams, to dig up the area of the well. Distinct markings and clues indicating to the whereabouts of the well were also revealed to him in the dream.

Thursday, 21 April 2016 06:45

The Well of Zam Zam is Lost

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After the demise of Hazrat Ismaa‘eel (‘alaihis salaam), his son, Qaydaar, assumed the role of trustee of the Ka'bah. This was in accordance with his parting advice. In this manner, the Banu Ismaa‘eel (the progeny of Hazrat Ismaa‘eel (‘alaihis salaam)) remained the trustees of the Ka'bah.

As time passed, however, hostilities and aggression erupted between the Banu Ismaa‘eel and the Banu Jurhum. In due course, the Banu Jurhum prevailed and subsequently established their rule over Makkah Mukarramah. Before long, the Jurhum rulers had unleashed their aggression, tyranny and cruelty over the people of Makkah Mukarramah. This ruthless brutality drove the Banu Ismaa‘eel out of Makkah Mukarramah and forced them to settle on its outskirts.

Wednesday, 13 April 2016 04:41

Hazrat Ismaa'eel ('alaihis salaam) and the Jurhum Tribe

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The birthplace of the Jurhum tribe was actually Yemen. A severe drought had struck Yemen and this had forced the Banu Jurhum to leave Yemen in search of more promising livelihood.

During the course of their travels, they coincidentally met Hazrat Ismaa‘eel (‘alaihis salaam) and his honourable mother, Hazrat Haajar (‘alaihas salaam), in the vicinity of the Zam Zam well. Banu Jurhum took a liking for this area and decided to settle down here. Hazrat Ismaa‘eel (‘alaihis salaam) also later on married a lady from the same tribe. After blessing him with the position of prophethood, Allah Ta‘ala commissioned him to the ‘Amaaliqah, Jurhum and the people of Yemen.

He passed away at the age of one hundred and thirty and was buried in the area of the Hateem, close to the grave of his honourable mother.

(Extracted from Seeratul Mustafa 1/34)

‘Abdul Muttalib

His name was Shaybatul Hamd and he was incredibly handsome. A poet describes his beauty thus:

على شيبة الحمد الذي كان وجهه يضيئ ظلام الليل كالقمر البدري

“Like the luminance of the fourteenth moon, Shaybatul Hamd’s face brightens the darkness of the night.”

‘Abdul Muttalib literally means “the slave of ‘Muttalib”. On the death of Haashim, ‘Abdul Muttalib’s mother lived in Madinah Munawwarah with her people, the Banu Khazraj, for some time. As he grew older, his uncle from Makkah Mukarramah, Muttalib, came to Madinah Munawwarah to fetch him.

Haashim (continued)

During the days of Haj, Haashim would feed all the hujjaaj (pilgrims) with meat, bread, saweeq and dates and would also provide them with Zam Zam water. He would make similar provisions for them at Mina, Muzdalifah and ‘Arafaat.

Umayyah bin ‘Abdu Shams was very upset over Haashim’s generosity and influence over the Arabs. Umayyah thus also attempted to feed the pilgrims just as Haashim was feeding them. However, despite his excessive wealth, he was unable to compete with Haashim. This was the initial catalyst that sparked off the hostility which the Banu Umayyah expressed for the Banu Haashim.

Haashim (continued)

Haashim was the first to initiate the custom of sending off two trade caravans a year; one to Syria in summer and another to Yemen in winter. According to this unvarying custom, a caravan would set out in every season of the year. These caravans would travel in winter across desolate swathes of land, at times at times through the desert and at times crossing the sea, until they would arrive at Yemen and even further, at Ethiopia.

Najaashi, the emperor of Ethiopia, was exceedingly hospitable towards Haashim and would present many gifts to him. In summer, the caravans would travel to Syria (including Jordan and Lebanon), Gaza and Ankara (which was then the capital of Rome). Heraclius, the Byzantine emperor, would also approach Haashim with utmost respect and would often present gifts to him.


Imaam Maalik (rahimahullah) and Imaam Shaafi‘ee (rahimahullah) say that Haashim’s actual name was ‘Amr.

There was once a severe drought in Makkah during which Haashim fed the people bread crushed into gravy. This is why he was given the title “Haashim” (The one who crushes). As a poet says:

عمرو العلا هشم الثريد لقومه ورجال مكة مسنتون عجاف

“The exalted ‘Amr prepared Thareed (a dish of meat and gravy into which bread is crushed) for his people (and fed it to them) when the people of Makkah were left weak and thin by the drought.”


In the pre-Islamic era, Ka‘b bin Luwayy would, on a weekly basis, gather all the people on the day of Friday. After all the people had assembled, he would deliver a sermon which he would commence by praising Allah Ta‘ala and explaining that Allah Ta‘ala had created the skies, the earth, the moon, the sun and all other forms of creation. He would thereafter give the people beneficial advices and would encourage them to maintain family ties.

He would also mention: “A prophet is to appear amongst my descendants. If you are alive in that era, ensure that you follow him.”


His name conformed to the name of the Nabi of Allah Ta‘ala, Hazrat Ilyaas (‘alaihis salaam).

The Sunnah (tradition) of herding the Hadi (sacrificial) animals towards Baytullah (in Makkah) was commenced by Ilyaas bin Mudhar. It has been reported that Ilyaas bin Mudhar would often hear the Talbiyah of Haj being recited by Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) from his own spine.

It has also been narrated that Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam) said, “Do not speak ill of Ilyaas as he was a Muslim.”


Most Ulama are of the opinion that Mudrikah’s name was ‘Amr. The name “Mudrikah” is derived from the word “Idraak” which means “achievement”. He was awarded the title of Mudrikah (the achiever) as he had excelled and attained success in virtually every department of his life.


He was from the progeny of Qaydar bin Ismaa‘eel.


Ma‘ad was an extraordinarily strong and gallant warrior. He spent his entire life fighting against the Banu Israa’eel and was triumphant in all his battles. His appellation was Abu Nazar. (“Appellation” refers to a name by which the father is called in attribution to his eldest child e.g. Abu Muhammed – Father of Muhammed)

Ma‘ad bin ‘Adnaan was a twelve year old lad during the reign of the famous king, Bukhtenasr. Allah Ta’ala informed the Nabi of that era, Hazrat Armiyaa’ bin Halqiyaa (‘alaihis salaam), through divine revelation, to convey the following message to Bukhtenasr: “We (i.e. Allah Ta‘ala) pledge to grant you (i.e. Bukhtenasr) dominance over the Arabs. And you, O Prophet! Take this young boy, Ma‘ad bin ‘Adnaan, away with you on your horse (Buraaq) so that he does not suffer any harm. I will extract from the spine of Ma‘ad a noble prophet (Hazrat Muhammed (sallallahu ‘alaihi wasallam)) with whom I will seal the succession of prophets (i.e. he will be the seal of all prophets) Accordingly, Hazrat Armiyaa’ (‘alaihis salaam) mounted his Buraaq, seated the young Ma‘ad bin ‘Adnaan with him, and left him in Syria. Here, in Syria, he grew up and lived with the Banu Israa’eel. This is one of the reasons for the lineage of Ma‘ad bin ‘Adnaan being so well known amongst the ‘Ulamaa of the Ahl-e-Kitaab (Jews and Christians).

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